THE FEED

  • TUNE IN

  • .@martyjdurbin , @KateriCallahan, @AmyREricson and Todd Skare before panel on #energy productivity. #2014AEMCSummit http://t.co/3JkyTnPpIW

    From: @ANGAus

  • From: @ANGAus September 17, 2014

    .@martyjdurbin , @KateriCallahan, @AmyREricson and Todd Skare before panel on #energy productivity. #2014AEMCSummit http://t.co/3JkyTnPpIW

  • Former Treasury Secretary Summers Again Calls for Increasing U.S. Energy Exports

    From: ANGA Blog

  • From: ANGA Blog September 10, 2014

    Former Treasury Secretary Summers Again Calls for Increasing U.S. Energy Exports

    On Tuesday, former Treasury Secretary Larry Summers called for ending the U.S. ban on exporting crude oil. This would lead to a number of benefits, including lower gas prices, increased economic growth, a reduction in the trade deficit and a stronger U.S. dollar, Politico reported.

    “The merits are as clear as the merits with respect to any significant public policy issue that I have ever encountered,” Summers said at an event hosted by the Brookings Institution on the release of the study “Changing Markets: Economic Opportunities from Lifting the U.S. Ban on Crude Oil Exports.”

    The study is a follow up to a 2012 Brookings study on liquefied natural gas (LNG) exports, which concluded that “allowing natural gas exports would not materially impact U.S. natural gas prices, but would contribute to energy security by diversifying global LNG markets while sustaining U.S. natural gas production and providing more competitive gas pricing.”

    According to Summers, the current ban on oil exports was passed at a much different time for American energy, when the U.S. imported most of its oil. Today, however, the American energy boom has been so significant that the U.S. may soon lead the world in crude oil output.

    “So we have for the first time a situation today that we have not had in at least two generations, namely that the market is sending signals that it is desirable on free market grounds to export U.S. oil,” he said.

    Summers’ comments build on ones he made earlier this year, when he spoke forcefully in favor of LNG exports at an Export-Import Bank Conference in Washington, D.C.:

    We have the potential – there is no question – within the next decade for America to have the kind of influence in the world because of its ability to export fossil fuels that Saudi Arabia has had for the last several decades. Think about what that means for our influence in the world. Think about what that means for our capacity for prosperity… anyone who believes in U.S. competitiveness has to believe that when you've got a massive advantage and a new opportunity, you need to be able to export it. That's what we've told every other country in the world for the last 50 years, and we need to tell it to ourselves. And that means more permitting for the export of natural gas…

    It’s clear that American energy policy needs to better reflect the amazing energy advantage our country has been blessed with thanks to advances in technology. We should sieze this opportunity to lead the world in energy and transform the American economy.

  • ANGA Comments on Final DOE Approval of Cameron, Carib LNG Export Facilities

    From: ANGA Press Releases

  • From: ANGA Press Releases September 10, 2014

    ANGA Comments on Final DOE Approval of Cameron, Carib LNG Export Facilities

    Background: Following is a statement by Frank Macchiarola, executive vice president of government affairs at America’s Natural Gas Alliance, on the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) decision to grant final approval to the Cameron LNG LLC and Carib Energy LLC for the export of natural gas to non-free trade agreement nations.

    “DOE’s decision to grant final approval to Cameron LNG and Carib Energy is a positive step toward improving American energy and economic security. In particular, the approval to export 1.7 billion cubic feet per day of liquefied natural gas from the Cameron facility can help strengthen our standing globally while creating jobs and advancing the economy right here in the United States. We hope that the administration will proceed swiftly with approval for all terminals that are under review so that our nation can seize this window of opportunity to be a major player in global natural gas markets.”

  • RT @EIAgov: Today in #Energy: #Natgas, solar, wind lead power plant capacity additions in first-half 2014 http://t.co/IBYRu7gR5r http://t.c…

    From: @ANGAus

  • From: @ANGAus September 9, 2014

    RT @EIAgov: Today in #Energy: #Natgas, solar, wind lead power plant capacity additions in first-half 2014 http://t.co/IBYRu7gR5r http://t.c

  • “Transformational” New Atlantic Coast Pipeline Will Bring Natural Gas to Southeast

    From: ANGA Blog

  • From: ANGA Blog September 2, 2014

    “Transformational” New Atlantic Coast Pipeline Will Bring Natural Gas to Southeast

    Several energy companies today announced their intentions to create a major new 550-mile interstate natural gas pipeline called the Atlantic Coast Pipeline. The pipeline will transport Marcellus and Utica natural gas from West Virginia southeast to Virginia and North Carolina and will be in service by 2018.

    This is great news for consumers and businesses in North Carolina and Virginia who will gain access to the abundant natural gas in the Marcellus and Utica regions. And it will mean an immediate boost to the economies of the pipeline states.

    In a joint statement, the CEOs of Dominion, Duke Energy, Piedmont Natural Gas and AGL Resources said of the pipeline, “It will create thousands of construction jobs during development and significant new revenue for state and local governments throughout North Carolina, Virginia and West Virginia. The expanded source of gas will also help fuel future economic development across the region as businesses and homes rely more on natural gas.”

    Virginia Governor Terry McAuliffe also hailed the announcement, saying that the Atlantic Coast Pipeline "is a game changer for Virginia's economy, and the benefits will be both immediate and long-lasting." He added that "this will allow Dominion, who has coal plants that are 50, 60 years old, which they plan on shutting down — this a lot less emissions. So what we’re doing today is great for the environment... This is a win-win today for everybody.”

    The new pipeline will primarily be used for six utilities and related companies in the region, which will mean more reliability and stability for the area's energy consumers. Last winter’s extremely cold temperatures, which resulted in high demand for natural gas across much of the U.S., underscored the national need for more natural gas pipelines.

    Though it will take time for the benefits of this pipeline to be fully realized, it is a welcome development as cooler weather approaches.

  • Natural Gas Takes Off at Denver International Airport

    From: ANGA Blog

  • From: ANGA Blog September 2, 2014

    Natural Gas Takes Off at Denver International Airport

    Airports are a critical part of our transportation infrastructure. Almost like cities in themselves, they require a reliable source of energy to move thousands of employees, passengers and bags each day.

    For years airports have relied on traditional energy sources to meet their needs, but Denver International Airport (DIA) is breaking the mold through its extensive use of natural gas.

    As a LEED-Gold certified destination at the foot of the Rocky Mountains, DIA is not just one of the busiest airline hubs in America, it is one of the most environmentally sustainable and each day, natural gas helps the airport come to life.

    From heating more than 5.5 million square feet of buildings to supplying fuel for its vehicle and bus fleet, natural gas is a key piece of DIA’s sustainability strategy, and one that’s not likely to change in the future.

    Watch our video now and get the full story of DIA’s incredible transformation:


    Airport CEO, Kim Day, reaffirmed the airport’s mission to create a “green gateway” to the rest of the world by using natural gas and other environmentally sustainable practices.

    “We continue to invest in initiatives that reduce our carbon footprint and preserve the natural assets of Colorado,” Day said. “Most significant is our investment in green initiatives that are financially viable, which assures their perpetuity even in times of economic downturn.”

    “Natural gas is a key part of our energy portfolio, as it provides a lower-cost and more environmentally friendly solution for many of our operations,” Day added.

    Colorado’s own supply of natural gas helps fuel the transformation at DIA and across the state. As natural gas gains greater adoption, this resource will surely help other businesses and communities take off in a sustainable way, too.

    That’s something to think about.

  • Natural Gas Leads New Power Generation in 2014

    From: ANGA Blog

  • From: ANGA Blog September 2, 2014

    Natural Gas Leads New Power Generation in 2014

    More than half of new power generated this year has come from natural gas, the U.S. Energy Information Administration announced last week. According to the agency, in the first six months of 2014, 4,350 megawatts of new utility-scale generating capacity came online. Natural gas plants made up more than half of the additions, while solar plants contributed more than a quarter and wind plants around one-sixth.

    Of the four states that have added the most capacity so far this year, three of them did so using almost entirely natural gas. Florida added the most capacity of any state, all of it natural gas combined-cycle capacity. Utah added all natural-gas combined cycle capacity and Texas added nearly all of its capacity from natural gas.

    Natural gas’s importance to our energy future will become even greater in the years to come. Because of abundance of natural gas supplies, the Energy Information Administration is estimating that natural gas plants will account for 63% of all new power plant additions through 2040, compared to 31% for renewables, 3% for coal-fired plants and 3% for nuclear.

    Clearly, utilities and consumers have realized that enough natural gas will be there, at an affordable price, to plan for a future in which gas will be the go-to fuel for power plants. That means cleaner air and more efficient power production for years to come. A win-win for America!

  • Deciding on a Major? How About a Degree in Energy?

    From: ANGA Blog

  • From: ANGA Blog August 27, 2014

    Deciding on a Major? How About a Degree in Energy?

    It’s Labor Day weekend and the summer is coming to its unofficial end. Millions of students are entering higher education for the first time; soon they will need to pick a major, and finding a job after graduation is often a primary challenge.

    For many, the choice is a simple one – a degree in energy production. With a high demand for skilled workers, students across the country are finding opportunity right out of school, as the graduating class of 2014 can illustrate:

    Tim Bradley is a case in point. A recently minted graduate of Lackawanna College’s School of Petroleum and Natural Gas, he quickly landed a job as a field pipeline technician, working on compressors, dehydration, pipelines and gathering lines. The salary from his pre-graduation internship alone was enough to let him purchase his first home. He’s upbeat about his own future -- and the industry’s.

    “I see natural gas as having a positive impact on the world,” says Bradley. “It’s a step in the right direction on greenhouse gases.”

    The School of Petroleum and Natural Gas at Lackawanna College was established in 2009 to help Pennsylvanians learn the skills needed for jobs on the Marcellus Shale. This year, as in years past, more than 90% of the graduating class’ students have already received a job offer. That placement rate contrasts starkly with the bleak picture for U.S. college graduates as a whole: more than 40% of recent college grads can’t secure jobs in their chosen fields, and nearly two million young Americans have given up looking for work altogether, according to recent research.

    The energy industry’s growth is creating opportunities for this generation. Unconventional oil and gas development has created more than 1.7 million American jobs and will account for an estimated 3 million by 2020, according to the IHS. To help supply skilled workers for this boom, specialized training programs similar to Lackawanna’s have been established across the country – at McMurry Training Center in Casper, Wyo. and West Virginia Northern Community College in Wheeling, W.V.; at Broome Community College in New York and Ohio’s Youngstown State University; and at many other places in between.

    Albert Castaneda, a California native, recently graduated with an engineering degree from Colorado School of Mines, where he appreciated the hands-on teaching environment. “Until you actually see what happens on a drill rig, you can’t put classroom teachings in perspective – so they get us on rigs quickly.” Castaneda, now working as an engineer in Colorado, finds inspiration in industry’s use of cutting-edge technologies to deliver a basic need. “People take it for granted that they can run their car or heat their home, but they don’t understand all of the work that goes into creating that power,” he added.

    The job growth in the energy sector is also attracting graduates who previously might have sought careers in law or finance. Blake Garrett is one such graduate. Having earned an MBA several years ago he turned down a Wall Street job, uninspired by the prospect of spending his days cold-calling prospective clients. Instead, he enrolled at Texas Tech to pursue a degree in energy engineering. Now he’s working for Anadarko as a field office production engineer in Fort Collins, Colo. “I’m excited,” Garrett says. “In production, you’re exposed to the drilling and to the completion. You learn so much.”

    And for many recent energy program graduates, a skilled job in natural gas means staying closer to home. Lackawanna graduate Megan Oliver was recently hired as an operations technician working in the midstream on gathering pipelines and compressor stations – applying lessons learned about hard work growing up on her parents’ Pennsylvania dairy farm. “Natural gas is going to change a lot of lives, especially around here. It is providing a lot of jobs to local people. That is why I wanted to get involved – I could see I could be part of that impact.”

    Oliver’s position is indicative of another trend in the industry: according to IHS projections, the number of women employed as petroleum engineers, managers and professionals are expected to grow by almost 70,000 between 2010 and 2030.

    At a time when many recent graduates are struggling to find work, the natural gas jobs engine is powering the American Dream for a new generation of American men and women. That’s something to think about.

  • RT @exxonmobil: #DidYouKnow: Often, #energy supports energy, like #natgas backing up wind. http://t.co/Mm8DLv0Yk5

    From: @ANGAus

  • From: @ANGAus August 27, 2014

    RT @exxonmobil: #DidYouKnow: Often, #energy supports energy, like #natgas backing up wind. http://t.co/Mm8DLv0Yk5

  • RT @exxonmobil: #DidYouKnow: Often, #energy supports energy, like #natgas backing up wind. http://t.co/MTNdkIZVRs

    From: @ANGAus

  • From: @ANGAus August 27, 2014

    RT @exxonmobil: #DidYouKnow: Often, #energy supports energy, like #natgas backing up wind. http://t.co/MTNdkIZVRs

  • Missouri School District Makes Move Toward Natural Gas

    From: ANGA Blog

  • From: ANGA Blog August 21, 2014

    Missouri School District Makes Move Toward Natural Gas

    As schools around the country open their doors to new classes, students in and around Kansas City will enjoy a cleaner, quieter ride than most.

    Kansas City, Missouri and Kansas, and surrounding areas are a hotbed for natural gas vehicles, and especially school buses.

    Lee’s Summit, Missouri, a suburban district southeast of Kansas City, operates one of the nation’s cleanest school bus fleets. With 106 of its 149 buses fueled by clean, efficient natural gas, Lee’s Summit is thought to be the largest in the country.

    Motivated by cost savings and a desire to choose a cleaner, more modern technology, Lee’s Summit shifted the bulk of its fleet to compressed natural gas (CNG) in just two years.

    “We were looking to reduce costs, and we wanted a technology that would last a long time,” said Linda Thompson, the district’s transportation director. “Investing in CNG buses was a smart long-term move. CNG made the most sense.”

    Thompson says the district expects to save $11 million over 10 years in fuel and maintenance costs.

    Thompson has seen unexpected benefits as well.

    As soon as the CNG buses came into use last fall, they were a hit with the Lee’s Summit community. Parents appreciated that the buses were cleaner. Students thought the buses looked cool. And bus drivers tried to get assigned to the CNG vehicles.

    “Drivers love them,” said Regina Hancock, the transportation department’s safety coordinator and a driver trainer. “It’s calmer because the students are quieter -- they don’t have to yell over the noise of a diesel engine. And it’s cooler, because the engines are in the rear rather than right below the driver.”

    Kansas City, Missouri, has used CNG vehicles since 1996 and now has hundreds of natural gas vehicles, including all the shuttle buses at Kansas City International Airport. The city is converting more of its heavy-duty vehicles to CNG, and Fleet Superintendent Sam Swearngin – considered the “godfather” of natural gas vehicles in the Kansas City area – says the fuel cost savings and lower emissions make the investment more than worthwhile.

    Just to the west, the school district of Kansas City, Kansas, has 47 CNG buses that it began purchasing in 2011. George Taylor, the district’s director of transportation at the time, led the conversion with strong support from the Board of Education and the Superintendent.

    The area’s youngest students also enjoy the benefits of these buses – albeit from a different angle.

    “My grandson is going on five and is starting Kindergarten,” said Lee’s Summit’s Thompson. “He’s so excited about riding on the ‘Caterpillar Bus.’ He calls it that because the side mirrors look like ears.”

    Whatever your reason for enjoying natural gas vehicles – lower emissions, abundant fuel, long-term savings or caterpillar ears – you’ll find plenty to like about the Kansas City area’s direction, one that more and more school and municipal fleets are taking. That’s something to think about.

  • RT @EIAgov: Today in #Energy: Hawaii and #US Territories aim to increase fuel diversity with #LNG imports http://t.co/5GG9rYxzN0 http://t.c…

    From: @ANGAus

  • From: @ANGAus August 19, 2014

    RT @EIAgov: Today in #Energy: Hawaii and #US Territories aim to increase fuel diversity with #LNG imports http://t.co/5GG9rYxzN0 http://t.c

  • Staying Cool with Natural Gas

    From: ANGA Blog

  • From: ANGA Blog August 19, 2014

    Staying Cool with Natural Gas

    This time of year, America gets serious about staying cool. Increasingly they are getting sweet relief from the heat using a cleaner and abundant form of electricity – natural gas.

    Nationally, 14 percent of the electricity used each year is devoted to cooling homes and commercial buildings. That number grows to more than 20 percent in the south.

    Air conditioning use in America is growing and natural gas is increasingly the fuel of choice for those seeking respite from the summer’s swelter. That’s a good thing, and it means our electricity will be cleaner, more affordable and diverse:

    • The Energy Information Administration estimates that natural gas plants will account for 63 percent of all new power plants through 2040.
    • Power sector greenhouse gas emissions reached a 20-year low in 2013.
    • Modern combined-cycle natural gas power plants use 35 percent less fuel per megawatt-hour of electricity produced.
    • Thanks in part to abundant natural gas supplies, the average U.S. household will gain an estimated $926 a year in disposable income.

    As an affordable solution to beating the heat, we’re thrilled to see natural gas use continue to grow. It’s just one of many reasons why natural gas has a growing role in our nation's power portfolio.

  • RT @EIAgov: Today in #Energy: Reasons for projected #natgas-fired generation growth vary by region http://t.co/PY9lgrSvid http://t.co/SQlh1…

    From: @ANGAus

  • From: @ANGAus August 15, 2014

    RT @EIAgov: Today in #Energy: Reasons for projected #natgas-fired generation growth vary by region http://t.co/PY9lgrSvid http://t.co/SQlh1

  • Levels of #natgas storage will exceed earlier projections from @EIAgov. #energy http://t.co/6yEO6QjijG

    From: @ANGAus

  • From: @ANGAus August 14, 2014

    Levels of #natgas storage will exceed earlier projections from @EIAgov. #energy http://t.co/6yEO6QjijG

  • EIA Reports: Natural Gas Production, Storage Levels Expected to Grow Through 2014

    From: ANGA Blog

  • From: ANGA Blog August 14, 2014

    EIA Reports: Natural Gas Production, Storage Levels Expected to Grow Through 2014

    Natural gas production will exceed previous expectations and surpass the record-high levels reached in 2013 according to the Short-Term Energy Outlook (STEO) released Wednesday by the Energy Information Administration (EIA). In addition, EIA expects the amount of natural gas in storage to also exceed its predictions.

    EIA is the statistical arm of the U.S. Department of Energy. The Short-Term Energy Outlook covers for the next 18 months.

    Reported by Reuters, here are some highlights:

    EIA projects that natural gas production in 2014 will rise to 73.9 billion cubic feet per day (bcfd). This is a more than 5 percent increase from 2013 levels.

    This increase will set a fourth straight annual record thanks to the amounts of natural gas being produced in Texas and in the Marcellus Shale.

    Natural gas storage will reach 3.4 trillion cubic feet (tcf) at the end of October of this year. This projection is up 3.43 tcf from EIA’s forecast in early July.

    EIA’s projections illustrate a number of promising elements. First, production of our abundant natural gas supply is exceeding expectations, allowing for natural gas to meet our growing clean energy demands. Second, our supplies of natural gas should meet the demands of customers this coming winter. Overall, EIA’s outlook reconfirms that our nation has an abundant supply of clean and affordable natural gas that will meet our energy demands well in to the future.

    You can read the Short-Term Energy Outlook here.

  • Pennsylvania Transit Authority Adds CNG Buses

    From: ANGA Blog

  • From: ANGA Blog August 5, 2014

    Pennsylvania Transit Authority Adds CNG Buses

    Pennsylvania sits atop of the nation’s largest producing shale play, the Marcellus Shale. It also is home to a growing number of fleets fueled by compressed natural gas (CNG). Fleet operators across the state recognize the economic and environmental benefits of using locally produced natural gas. The latest example lies in the Monongahela River Valley outside of Pittsburgh.

    Pennsylvania sits atop of the nation’s largest producing shale play, the Marcellus Shale. It also is home to a growing number of fleets fueled by compressed natural gas (CNG). Fleet operators across the state recognize the economic and environmental benefits of using locally produced natural gas. The latest example lies in the Monongahela River Valley outside of Pittsburgh.

    The Mid Mon Valley Transit Authority serves communities in Washington, Westmoreland and Fayette Counties. By fall, five of the authority’s 30 buses will run on CNG.

    MMVTA plans to convert its entire fleet to CNG over the next 12 years. It’s easy to see why: on average, natural gas municipal fleets save 15 percent to 28 percent on fuel and maintenance costs, and natural gas vehicles (NGVs) also bring considerable environmental benefits: converting to natural gas reduces a vehicle’s greenhouse gas emissions by as much as 20 percent and cuts smog-producing pollutants by up to 90 percent.

    As this article from TribLive reports, MMVTA operations manager Bob Smith cited the nearby Marcellus Shale’s abundant reserves of natural gas:

    “’We're sitting on available Marcellus shale and available natural gas,’” Smith said. “’We have gas for the long run. And it's environmentally cleaner for these buses.’”

    ANGA welcomes MMVTA’s leadership, drivers and riders to the growing community of NGV supporters who recognize that natural gas vehicles are the best way to get from Point A to Point B cleanly and affordably.

  • Western Pennsylvania Transit Authority Adds CNG Buses

    From: ANGA Blog

  • From: ANGA Blog August 5, 2014

    Western Pennsylvania Transit Authority Adds CNG Buses

    Pennsylvania sits atop of the nation’s largest producing shale play, the Marcellus Shale. It also is home to a growing number of fleets fueled by compressed natural gas (CNG). Fleet operators across the state recognize the economic and environmental benefits of using locally produced natural gas. The latest example lies in the Monongahela River Valley outside of Pittsburgh.

    The Mid Mon Valley Transit Authority serves communities in Washington, Westmoreland and Fayette Counties. By fall, five of the authority’s 30 buses will run on CNG.

    MMVTA plans to convert its entire fleet to CNG over the next 12 years. It’s easy to see why: on average, natural gas municipal fleets save 15 percent to 28 percent on fuel and maintenance costs, and natural gas vehicles (NGVs) also bring considerable environmental benefits: converting to natural gas reduces a vehicle’s greenhouse gas emissions by as much as 20 percent and cuts smog-producing pollutants by up to 90 percent.

    As this article from TribLive reports, MMVTA operations manager Bob Smith cited the nearby Marcellus Shale’s abundant reserves of natural gas:

    “’We're sitting on available Marcellus shale and available natural gas,’” Smith said. “’We have gas for the long run. And it's environmentally cleaner for these buses.’”

    ANGA welcomes MMVTA’s leadership, drivers and riders to the growing community of NGV supporters who recognize that natural gas vehicles are the best way to get from Point A to Point B cleanly and affordably.

  • The Grand Canyon: Natural Gas for a Natural Landmark

    From: ANGA Blog

  • From: ANGA Blog August 4, 2014

    The Grand Canyon: Natural Gas for a Natural Landmark

    Each summer, vacationers flock to the Grand Canyon for its breathtaking, scenic views. And while most park-goers are focused on the canyon’s beauty, cleaner-burning natural gas is helping to keep the park – well, natural.

    America’s Natural Landmark

    In an effort to preserve the Grand Canyon’s scenic views and surrounding environment, the National Park Service began using compressed natural gas (CNG) to fuel buses and heavy equipment in 1998. Now, the Grand Canyon’s entire fleet of shuttle buses runs on compressed natural gas.

    Carl Bowman, an air quality specialist at Grand Canyon National Park, explained that the environmental benefits associated with natural gas made the fuel a natural fit for use within the national park. “Having an entire fleet of CNG powered buses is a very holistic approach to Grand Canyon’s transportation needs,” explained Bowman, “people get cleaner engines, better air quality, and a better visitor experience overall.”

    With almost 5 million visitors per year, park sustainability efforts are essential in order to preserve and protect the local environment, and preserve the visitor experience. So it makes perfect sense that the Grand Canyon would be fueled by an equally in-demand American resource, natural gas.

  • ANGA Comments on Colorado Ballot Measures Announcement

    From: ANGA Press Releases

  • From: ANGA Press Releases August 4, 2014

    ANGA Comments on Colorado Ballot Measures Announcement

    Background: Following is a statement by ANGA Executive Vice President Frank Macchiarola, on a decision announced today by Colorado Governor John Hickenlooper to form a special commission to review Colorado rules for oil and natural gas development.

    “We are confident that an objective review of the natural gas industry’s work will lead to a commission recommendation that makes it possible for Coloradans to continue to enjoy the many economic and environmental benefits that safe and responsible natural gas development provides. We support the withdrawal of the Polis ballot measures, which would hurt Colorado jobs and weaken America’s energy security.”