THE FEED

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  • ANGA Calls New EPA Methane Rules Unnecessary, Counterproductive

    From: ANGA Press Releases

  • From: ANGA Press Releases August 18, 2015

    ANGA Calls New EPA Methane Rules Unnecessary, Counterproductive

    Background: Following is a statement by Marty Durbin, president and chief executive officer for America's Natural Gas Alliance, on proposals by the Environmental Protection Agency of new methane regulations.

    "Since 2005, natural gas producers have cut methane emissions 38 percent, while increasing production 35 percent. This impressive record has been accomplished through existing regulations and industry innovation. With further improvements certain to continue, we believe new and additional regulations are both unnecessary and counterproductive. This rule is simply not the best way to achieve our shared goal of methane emissions reductions.

    "Natural gas producers will continue reducing methane emissions regardless of this proposal. Not only do we have an incentive to capture methane – it is the product we sell – but our track record of efficiency improvement and innovation are what drives the environmental, economic and energy security benefits of natural gas. A collaborative approach will bring greater reductions more quickly than new and unnecessary regulation."

  • Methane Emission Reductions: An Industry Success Story

    From: ANGA Blog

  • From: ANGA Blog August 12, 2015

    Methane Emission Reductions: An Industry Success Story

    The Obama administration recently announced forthcoming standards for methane emissions from new and modified oil and gas production sources, despite saying "voluntary efforts to reduce emissions in a comprehensive and transparent manner hold the potential to realize significant reductions in a quick, flexible, cost-effective way."

    The natural gas industry has already dramatically reduced methane emissions even as production and use have soared. New regulations will take too much time and yield too few benefits, compared with a collaborative approach.

    Because methane is the product we sell there is great motivation to capture as much as possible. Innovations have led to safer, faster, more efficient and less costly methods of production, allowing our nation to enjoy the environmental, economic and energy security benefits of this abundant, domestic resource.

    Industry has already worked with the EPA on regulation to require reduced emission, or "green", completions to capture natural gas at the wellhead, which reduce methane emissions by 99 percent. The Energy Information Administration and EPA credit increased natural gas use for a significant portion of the 10 percent reduction in energy-related CO2 emissions in 2013 compared to 2005.

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration researchers also found that emissions of sulfur dioxide have dropped by 44 percent and nitrogen oxide emissions by 40 percent since 1997 due to the increased use of natural gas combined cycles in power generation. Our air is cleaner today because of natural gas and industry is committed to making even greater progress.

    Adding another complex and uncertain layer of federal regulation threatens to slow significant progress toward the shared objectives of a cleaner environment and a growing economy and is simply unnecessary to meet our goals. Current regulation, industry innovation and collaboration will pave the way for greater reductions more quickly than new regulation, allowing us to take better advantage of America's clean, abundant and affordable natural gas resource.

  • Natural Gas Producers Cut Methane Emissions

    From: ANGA Blog

  • From: ANGA Blog August 12, 2015

    Natural Gas Producers Cut Methane Emissions

    The United States has reduced carbon emissions more than any other country over the past eight years primarily due to the increased use of natural gas for power generation. As a result of technological innovation, methane emissions from natural gas production significantly decreased during a period of substantial increase in natural gas production. Below are examples of the innovative practices industry leaders have implemented to capture methane:

    • Taking part in the Environmental Defense Fund's Methane Detectors Challenge, Apache and four other oil and gas companies are challenging each other to develop and commercialize cost-effective technologies that provide real time detection of methane. The goal of the competition is to spur the use of new inexpensive technologies that could continuously monitor methane emissions, easing the process of finding and fixing leaks.
    • Chesapeake Energy's use of new systems has significantly improved efficiency and methane emissions reduction. Through their involvement with the Natural Gas STAR Program, Chesapeake is successfully using the Apogee LDS unit to survey gathering lines. The unit can be mounted in various modes of transportation, including helicopters, pickup trucks, or all-terrain vehicles.
    • Range Resources uses multiple techniques to minimize air emissions in their field operations, including installing a Vapor Destruction Unit that collects hydrocarbons in shallower formations during drilling and safely burns them before they enter the air. They also facilitate a water recycling program that significantly reduces potential air emissions and community impact from truck traffic. When trucks are used during water transfer, Range required reducing idling times and tracks vehicles by satellite to ensure efficient and safe operations.
    • Southwestern Energy has been working with energy industry partners to create a methane leadership initiative called One Future with the goal of reducing methane emission from the entire natural gas value chain. They use ultra-lean burning engines to limit NOx emissions and have implemented green completions that minimize venting of volatile organic compounds and methane during well completion.

    In addition to these four examples, the natural gas industry is implementing other methane reduction strategies, including:

    • Forward-Looking Infrared (FLIR) technology, to ensure emissions are controlled and systems are leak free. The FLIR camera detects escaping gas and can be used to eliminate sources of fugitive emissions. Apache, Range Resources, Anadarko and Southwestern Energy use FLIR to survey their facilities and industrial areas where health and safety considerations receive special considerations.
    • Installation of vapor recovery towers, replacement of less-efficient compressors and creation of programs to conduct leak detection and repair surveys.

    Continued progress will be achieved through industry innovation and existing regulation. As industry leaders continue to set the standard, let's continue this momentum with a sensible approach to methane emissions by incentivizing progress rather than threatening innovation with an additional, unnecessary and uncertain regulatory approach.

  • ANGA Weighs In on EPA “Clean Power Plan”

    From: ANGA Blog

  • From: ANGA Blog August 6, 2015

    ANGA Weighs In on EPA “Clean Power Plan”

    This week, the Obama administration released its much-anticipated "Clean Power Plan," and America's Natural Gas Alliance (ANGA) has some strong views on what this does and doesn't mean for the nation's energy future.

    We have a high degree of confidence that natural gas will play a significant and growing role in electricity markets. It is clean, affordable and abundant – all reasons why states will plan a robust role for this American fuel when they begin making choices about what power source to use.

    Yesterday, the Energy Information Administration said that in April power sector carbon emissions had reached the lowest level since 1988. Not coincidentally, April was the first time in history that natural gas overtook coal as the number one fuel source for electricity. The connection is clear. Natural gas use in power generation reduces carbon emissions.

    On Monday, ANGA President and CEO Marty Durbin released a statement underscoring the critical role natural gas will play in America's clean power future:

    Natural gas is the most cost effective compliance option that states have in almost all cases as they contemplate where their future electricity will come from and how, specifically, they will balance the dual mandates of cleaner air and healthy economic growth.

    An accelerating move to natural gas is critical to keeping the lights on, heating and cooling our homes and fueling growth in domestic manufacturing, all while reducing air emissions. We stand ready to work with states, customers, consumers and the energy and environmental community to ensure that this transition moves forward efficiently and cost effectively.

    Durbin also raised questions about the administration's efforts to downplay the importance of natural gas in reducing carbon emissions, noting "The White House is ignoring market realities and …perpetuating the false choice between renewables and natural gas. We don't have to slow the trend toward gas in order to effectively and economically use renewables."

    ANGA Executive Vice President Frank Macchiarola echoed Durbin's comments, telling PoliticoPRO, "We were disappointed with the message the White House took this weekend, which was in a sense running away from natural gas. Whether or not that rhetoric turns into reality within the rulemaking is still to be determined."

    In an interview with Bloomberg TV, Macchiarola said, "With or without this rule, natural gas is well positioned to be the baseload fuel of choice for electricity generation." He also highlighted the incredible increase in natural gas production (40 percent over the last decade) and said, "The opportunity is really brighter than ever for natural gas."

    Catch more of ANGA's comments on the Clean Power Plan:

    This is a complicated rule and we will be spending time in the days, weeks and months ahead dissecting the data.

  • ANGA Statement on Power Sector CO2 Emissions Reaching 27-year Low in April

    From: ANGA Press Releases

  • From: ANGA Press Releases August 5, 2015

    ANGA Statement on Power Sector CO2 Emissions Reaching 27-year Low in April

    Background – Dan Whitten, senior director of communications and media affairs for America's Natural Gas Alliance (ANGA), issued the following statement on the release of new data from the Energy Information Association, the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy:

    "It's telling that in April 2015 - the month the United States generated more electricity from natural gas than from any other fuel source - the United States also emitted less carbon dioxide into the atmosphere than at any time since 1988. That's no coincidence. And that's why we think the White House was disingenuous about the role natural gas will play in the Clean Power Plan."

    "We have a high degree of confidence that natural gas will play a significant and growing role in electricity markets. It is clean, affordable and abundant – all reasons why states will plan a robust role for this American fuel when they begin making choices about what power source to use. Today's data from the Department of Energy shows how natural gas is already making a huge difference and we fully expect that to continue."

  • The Unsung Hero of Natural Gas Storage and Reliability

    From: ANGA Blog

  • From: ANGA Blog August 5, 2015

    The Unsung Hero of Natural Gas Storage and Reliability

    Storage is vital to the reliability and year-round availability of natural gas. With seasonal weather changes that impact both production and usage, storage helps balance the supply and demand curve to ensure consumers get natural gas when they need it.

    Underground salt caverns, depleted oil and gas fields, and aquifer fields are the most commonly used storage solutions. Salt cavern storage capacity has increased in recent years, and that is a good thing for natural gas reliability.

    Salt cavern storage has doubled in the Gulf Coast since 2008. [1] The majority of salt caverns used for storage are found in the southeastern United States and along the Gulf Coast. In fact, according to the Energy Information Administration (EIA), salt caverns provide 28 percent of daily deliverability, despite only accounting for 10 percent of underground storage locations.[2] Further, salt cavern storage accounts for only 7 percent of total stored natural gas volumes, while aquifers and depleted oil and gas fields represent 16 and 77 percent, respectively.[3]

    With shifting demand for natural gas use in power generation and residential heating and cooling, salt caverns have become a more attractive choice in recent years due to their versatility compared to other storage options. These facilities provide better deliverability (gas gets to market quickly), can be cycled (the process of withdrawing and refilling gas supplies) multiple times per year, and allow natural gas to be stored at a higher pressure. [4]

    Higher pressure storage allows salt facilities to deliver product to the market more quickly than other storage units, and a greater amount of cycling allows gas to be sold in the short-term with less price risk. [5] Depleted oil and gas fields and aquifer fields are typically limited to one cycle per year. Since gas from salt storage can be withdrawn and delivered easily, these storage units are often used to address weather-related demand peaks and peak day deliverability purposes.[6],[7]

    Typically, natural gas demand is higher in the winter when heating needs in the residential sector are high, resulting in a surge of withdrawals. However, as natural gas gains popularity in the power generation fuel mix, withdrawals will become more common year-round and may encourage a further increase in the use of salt caverns for storage.

    --

    [1] Oil & Gas 360, "Natural Gas Salt-Facility Storage in the Gulf has Doubled Since 2008", July 27, 2015, http://www.oilandgas360.com/natural-gas-salt-facility-storage-in-the-gulf-has-doubled-since-2008/.
    [2] EIA, "Natural gas salt-facility storage serves special gas market needs", July 27, 2015, http://www.eia.gov/todayinenergy/detail.cfm?id=22232&src=email.
    [3] ANGA analysis, EIA "Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity" data.
    [4] EIA, "Natural gas salt-facility storage serves special gas market needs", July 27, 2015, http://www.eia.gov/todayinenergy/detail.cfm?id=22232&src=email.
    [5] Oil & Gas 360, "Natural Gas Salt-Facility Storage in the Gulf has Doubled Since 2008", July 27, 2015, http://www.oilandgas360.com/natural-gas-salt-facility-storage-in-the-gulf-has-doubled-since-2008/.
    [6] FERC, "Natural Gas Storage – Storage Fields", June 3, 2015, https://www.ferc.gov/industries/gas/indus-act/storage/fields.asp.
    [7] EIA, "Natural gas salt-facility storage serves special gas market needs", July 27, 2015, http://www.eia.gov/todayinenergy/detail.cfm?id=22232&src=email.

  • In Order to Work, the Clean Power Plan Must Recognize Essential Natural Gas Role

    From: ANGA Press Releases

  • From: ANGA Press Releases August 3, 2015

    In Order to Work, the Clean Power Plan Must Recognize Essential Natural Gas Role

    Background: Following is a statement by Marty Durbin, president and CEO for America's Natural Gas Alliance, on the release by the Environmental Protection Agency of the 111(d) rule covering carbon emissions from existing power plants. It is possible that we will have further reaction today after the rule is released.

    "While we will need to review the final Clean Power Plan rule in its entirety when it is released, initial reports indicate that the White House is ignoring market realities and discounting the ability of natural gas to achieve the objective of emissions reductions more quickly and reliably while powering growth and helping consumers."

    "We are confident about the role that natural gas can and will play in America's clean power future. With the reported shift in the plan, we believe the White House is perpetuating the false choice between renewables and natural gas. We don't have to slow the trend toward gas in order to effectively and economically use renewables.

    "States' ability to incorporate more wind and solar energy into their power mix is dependent on natural gas combined cycle turbines that will quickly and cost-effectively pick up the slack when the sun doesn't shine or the wind doesn't blow.

    "Natural gas is the most cost effective compliance option that states have in almost all cases as they contemplate where their future electricity will come from and how, specifically, they will balance the dual mandates of cleaner air and healthy economic growth.

    "An accelerating move to natural gas is critical to keeping the lights on, heating and cooling our homes and fueling growth in domestic manufacturing, all while reducing air emissions. We stand ready to work with states, customers, consumers and the energy and environmental community to ensure that this transition moves forward efficiently and cost effectively."

  • ANGA Statement on the Introduction of the Waterways LNG Parity Act of 2015

    From: ANGA Press Releases

  • From: ANGA Press Releases July 30, 2015

    ANGA Statement on the Introduction of the Waterways LNG Parity Act of 2015

    Background: Following is a statement by America's Natural Gas Alliance (ANGA) Executive Vice President for Government Affairs Frank J. Macchiarola on the introduction of the Waterways LNG Parity Act of 2015.

    "ANGA commends Congressman Todd Young (R-IN) on the introduction of the Waterways LNG Parity Act of 2015, H.R. 3431. Natural gas is an increasingly attractive alternative fuel because of its environmental and economic benefits. This bill recognizes the opportunities for natural gas fuel in new markets such as the maritime sector, and levels the playing field to ensure that natural gas will be taxed at the same rate as traditional fuels.

    "The thousands of vessels operating on our nation's inland waterways play a significant role in interstate commerce and offer great opportunities for converting to domestic, clean and affordable natural gas. We thank Congressman Young for introducing legislation that makes it easier for our transportation sector to take advantage of America's abundant natural gas."

  • ANGA Statement on Congressional Passage of LNG Tax Parity Provision

    From: ANGA Press Releases

  • From: ANGA Press Releases July 30, 2015

    ANGA Statement on Congressional Passage of LNG Tax Parity Provision

    Background: Following is a statement by America's Natural Gas Alliance (ANGA) President and CEO Marty Durbin on passage of a provision to create tax parity for liquefied natural gas in the highway funding package.

    "We applaud Congress for including language to equalize the federal highway excise tax on liquefied natural gas (LNG) in the highway bill. This provision has garnered strong bipartisan support over the years, and we are thrilled to see it become law. The shale revolution is creating new opportunities for natural gas fuel in all sectors of our economy, and this legislation ensures that more vehicles can take advantage of clean, abundant and American natural gas."

  • ANGA Statement on Committee Passage of the Energy Policy Modernization Act of 2015

    From: ANGA Press Releases

  • From: ANGA Press Releases July 30, 2015

    ANGA Statement on Committee Passage of the Energy Policy Modernization Act of 2015

    Background: Following is a statement by America's Natural Gas Alliance (ANGA) President and CEO Marty Durbin on passage of the Energy Policy Modernization Act of 2015 by the Senate Committee on Energy and Natural Resources.

    "We applaud Chairman Murkowski, Ranking Member Cantwell and their colleagues on the Senate Energy Committee for the bipartisan passage of the Energy Policy Modernization Act of 2015. In particular, the bill's provisions to provide greater certainty for natural gas infrastructure permitting and for LNG export approvals will better allow our nation to take advantage of the many opportunities associated with our abundant natural gas resource. We commend the Committee and its staff for their tireless efforts in moving this important legislation and look forward to seeing it progress to the Senate floor."

  • Energy Infrastructure a Critical Part of Our Energy Renaissance

    From: ANGA Blog

  • From: ANGA Blog July 28, 2015

    Energy Infrastructure a Critical Part of Our Energy Renaissance

    As a result of technological advancements that have brought about the shale revolution, the United States is now a global leader in natural gas and oil production. In order to fully realize this enormous potential, it is critical that policymakers create an environment that supports infrastructure development across all regions of the United States. That is why we joined API on a letter to Chairman Murkowski and Ranking Member Cantwell, urging the Energy Committee's support for including legislative proposals in the Energy Policy Modernization Act of 2015 that:

    • enhance the federal permitting processes for oil and natural gas pipelines, and
    • clarify outstanding jurisdictional issues regarding the siting and permitting of pipelines on federal lands.

    A robust and modern infrastructure system is vital to ensuring we can fully realize the benefits of our nation's abundant energy resources.

    ---

    Click here to download the signed letter.

    July 28, 2015

    Dear Chairman Murkowski and Ranking Member Cantwell:

    On behalf of America's Natural Gas Alliance and the American Petroleum Institute, I write to express our support for the inclusion of policies that enhance federal oil and natural gas infrastructure permitting in the Energy Policy Modernization Act of 2015 (the "Act").

    Technological breakthroughs in the oil and natural gas industry have unleashed an energy renaissance, establishing the United States as the world's largest natural gas and oil producer. The energy landscape is very different than it was during consideration of the last comprehensive energy bill in 2005. Since the beginning of 2005, natural gas production in the United States has increased 41 percent. The U.S. Energy Information Administration projects a 48 percent increase in total natural gas production from 2010 to 2035 and an increase of over 4 million barrels of oil a day since 2008 (with a simultaneous reduction in the amount of imported oil). As a result of the shale energy revolution, America has moved from a position of energy scarcity to one of energy abundance.

    Our increased production is resulting in tremendous economic benefits and job creation. However, to fully realize the enormous potential of our oil and natural gas abundance, it is imperative that we also support the acceleration of infrastructure development in all regions of the United States. In fact, an analysis from the IHS consulting group found that essential infrastructure improvements in the oil and natural gas sector could, over the next decade, encourage as much as $1.15 trillion in new private capital investment, support 1.15 million new jobs, and add $120 billion on average per year to our nation's GDP.[1] A modernized infrastructure system alongside a rational and predictable regulatory regime will lead to a more secure connection between rising oil and natural gas production and growing regional demand. Achieving this balance will help us take full advantage of our vast domestic energy resource and strengthen our energy security.

    As the Committee moves forward with consideration of the Act, ANGA and API would like to express our support for legislative proposals[2] that seek to enhance federal permitting processes for oil and natural gas pipelines, as well as clarify outstanding jurisdictional issues regarding the siting and permitting of pipelines on federal lands. A robust energy infrastructure is vital to ensuring that we are fully realizing the benefits of our abundant domestic energy resources in all regions of the country.

    We appreciate the hard work of the Committee in seeking to advance our nation's energy policy in a manner that reflects our changed energy landscape and resulting opportunities. We look forward to working with you as this legislation moves forward.

    Please contact us if we can be of assistance.

    Sincerely,

    Frank J. Macchiarola

    Executive Vice President, Government Affairs

    America's Natural Gas Alliance

    Louis Finkel

    Executive Vice President, Government Affairs

    American Petroleum Institute


    [1] IHS Global, Inc., "Oil & Natural Gas Transportation & Storage Infrastructure: Status, Trends, & Economic Benefits", December 2013

    [2] ANGA and API support Amdt No. 11 introduced by Senator Capito and co-sponsored by Senator Heitkamp. This amendment will help improve coordination between FERC and other permitting agencies involved in federal authorizations for siting interstate natural gas pipelines. ANGA and API support Senators Cassidy and Barrasso's Amdt No. 10, which amends the Mineral Leasing Act to clarify the authority of the Secretary of the Interior in siting natural gas pipeline rights-of-way across certain federal lands. ANGA and API also support Senators Barrasso and Heitkamp's Natural Gas Gathering Enhancement Act (Amdt No. 43) as well as Senators Hoeven and Manchin's North American Energy Infrastructure Act amendment.

  • Capture LNG Opportunity with Smart Energy Policy

    From: ANGA Blog

  • From: ANGA Blog July 28, 2015

    Capture LNG Opportunity with Smart Energy Policy

    Yesterday, we joined API on a letter to Chairman Murkowski and Ranking Member Cantwell, urging their support for Sections 2201 and 2202 of the Energy Policy and Modernization Act of 2015. Originally introduced as S. 33 by Senators Barrasso and Heinrich, these provisions will accelerate America's rise as a world-class exporter of natural gas, while strengthening our domestic economy and our position in global energy markets.

    It has been ten years since Congress last considered comprehensive energy. Since then, technological breakthroughs have unlocked generations-worth of energy supply and established the United States as the world's largest producer of natural gas. EIA now projects a 48 percent increase in total natural gas production from 2010 to 2035.

    New policy has the potential to turn this opportunity into long-lasting global energy leadership. That's why we commend Senators Barrasso and Heinrich for their continued leadership, and encourage members of the Senate Committee on Energy and Natural Resources to support Sections 2201 and 2202 as introduced.

    ---

    Click here to download the signed letter.

    July 27, 2015

    Dear Chairman Murkowski and Ranking Member Cantwell:

    On behalf of America's Natural Gas Alliance and the American Petroleum Institute, we write to express our strong support for Sections 2201 and Section 2202 of the Energy Policy and Modernization Act of 2015 (the "Act"). Originally introduced by Senators Barrasso and Heinrich as the LNG Permitting Certainty and Transparency Act (S. 33), these provisions provide a streamlined process for natural gas export projects before the Department of Energy. This bill will accelerate America's rise as a world-class exporter of natural gas, creating U.S. jobs, growing our economy, and significantly strengthening the global energy market.

    Technological breakthroughs in the oil and natural gas industry have unleashed an energy renaissance, establishing the United States as the world's largest natural gas producer. We have enough natural gas to supply affordable energy domestically as well as to significantly increase U.S. participation in the global market for liquefied natural gas (LNG). The Act provides the Department of Energy a meaningful deadline to make decisions on pending applications that have completed the extensive environmental review process. Advancing this legislation will institute greater certainty into the LNG exports permitting process thereby accelerating investment in the U.S. economy and strengthening our strategic alliances abroad.

    Since the beginning of 2005, natural gas production in the United States has increased 41 percent. The U.S. Energy Information Administration projects a 48 percent increase in total natural gas production from 2010 to 2035, and study after study agrees that expanding our export opportunities will create jobs, strengthen our economy, and enhance our national and energy security. We appreciate the leadership of Senators Barrasso and Heinrich and the bipartisan co-sponsors of S. 33 and applaud the Committee for its inclusion of these policies in the Act. As this legislation moves forward, ANGA and API strongly encourage members of the Committee to support the language as introduced and oppose any efforts to undermine or stall America's future growth as an energy superpower.

    Please contact us if we can be of assistance.

    Sincerely,

    Frank J. Macchiarola
    Executive Vice President, Government Affairs
    America's Natural Gas Alliance

    Louis Finkel
    Executive Vice President
    American Petroleum Institute

  • Harnessing the Power of a Jet Engine

    From: ANGA Blog

  • From: ANGA Blog July 27, 2015

    Harnessing the Power of a Jet Engine

    With as much as 425 tons between its wingtips, it takes a lot of thrust to propel Boeing's iconic 747 across the globe. This almost physics-defying feat of engineering is accomplished with four state-of-the-art General Electric CF6 jet engines. While each engine is capable of pumping out more than 60,000 pound-feet of thrust, what's truly amazing is their underlying design allows them to be quite effective at generating electricity.

    GE's CF6 engine - Photo credit: GE

    The jet engine has been in existence since the early 1900's. Building upon the work of his predecessors, Frank Whittle, a mechanical engineer in the Royal Air Force of England, patented the first turbo-jet engine in 1930. By 1937, Whittle had a working model of his engine that would eventually be modified and used by the aviation community.

    It didn't take long for the gas turbine to find applications in other sectors. Just two short years after the first successful display of a jet engine's ability, Switzerland adapted this technology into the first gas turbine to be used for electricity generation. By 1949, General Electric implemented the first U.S.-based gas turbine generator in Oklahoma City.

    Mechanically speaking, jet engines and natural gas turbines are extremely similar. There are four main pieces that make up a gas turbine: A compressor, a combustion chamber, a turbine and a shaft that connects the compressor to the turbine. The compressor is a series of blades that draws air into the combustion chamber and creates a high-pressure volume of gas. Inside the combustion chamber, natural gas is added to the air mixture and ignited. This process causes the gas to rapidly expand and leave the chamber through another set of blades that make up the turbine.

    The shaft connects the compressor and turbine, and improves efficiency as the system undertakes what's known as a "positive feedback loop." As the turbine spins faster so too does the compressor, which sucks in more air and in turn speeds up the turbine.

    On a jet, propulsion is created when hot turbine exhaust exits the engine. To produce electricity, engines like GE's CF6 are modified for stationary use and connected to a generator. These power generators are known as "aeroderivatives."

    GE's LM6000 engine is based on the company's CF6 aviation unit - Photo credit: GE

    From providing The Texas Medical Center in Houston with reliable heat and electricity, to helping Egypt keep up with electricity demand, the natural gas turbine plays an essential role in delivering electricity to the people who need it.

  • Electricity: It’s All in the Mix

    From: ANGA Blog

  • From: ANGA Blog July 23, 2015

    Electricity: It’s All in the Mix

    "Don't put all your eggs in one basket" is good advice. That the U.S. generated more electricity in April from natural gas than any other energy source is proof our nation is (finally) taking it seriously. The benefit, of course, is an increasingly reliable electrical system that ensures the lights turn on when we flip the switch. And it's natural gas that is now driving the trend toward greater fuel diversity.

    As recently as 2000, more than half (52 percent) of electricity generated in our country came from one source - coal. Nuclear and natural gas accounted for roughly 20 percent each with renewables making up the rest.

    While we still get more electricity from coal than any other source, its share of generation has shrunk to around 39 percent. Meanwhile, other sources of electricity are expanding their contributions, resulting in a more diverse energy market. Natural gas has nearly doubled since 2000, and now accounts for more than a quarter of our energy mix (27 percent). That diversification creates jobs and regional economic benefits.

    The trend toward a more diverse and balanced electricity market is one that experts expect to continue, and it will result in a cleaner and more sustainable U.S. energy mix.

    In fact, a growing role for natural gas is one reason why overall greenhouse gas emissions from the United States are falling - even while we're producing more electricity than ever. In 2015, CO2 emissions from the power sector are expected to fall to their lowest levels since 1994, or 15.4 percent below 2005 levels.

    Renewable energy will also benefit. When the sun sets or the wind dies down, renewable energy can't deliver the "always on" power American consumers rightly demand. Because natural gas can quickly ramp up and down to meet fluctuations in electricity demand, it can reliably step in when the wind isn't blowing or the sun isn't shining. Renewable energy sources now account for about 13 percent of the energy mix, and that figure is likely to continue to grow thanks to the reliability that natural gas can deliver to the overall electric grid.

    You shouldn't put all your energy eggs in one basket. A growing role for natural gas is helping ensure that doesn't happen.

  • Carnival Cruise Line Embarks on Cleaner Direction

    From: ANGA Blog

  • From: ANGA Blog July 23, 2015

    Carnival Cruise Line Embarks on Cleaner Direction

    Each year, more than 10 million Americans set sail on a cruise. While the vast majority of the cruise ships, some the size of floating cities, are powered by diesel engines, a cleaner option now exists.

    The world's largest cruise ship company—Carnival Cruise Line — recently announced plans to launch a cruise ship powered by liquefied natural gas (LNG). But this isn't just your average cruise ship. With a 6,600-passenger capacity, it will carry more vacationers than any other cruise ship in operation.

    A shift to liquefied natural gas means these American cruise ships will no longer emit soot particles or sulfur oxides. That's right – a total elimination of two harmful pollutants - making the ships eco and ocean-friendly.

    Carnival will build four new ships that are scheduled to hit oceans in 2019. The vessels will be 100 percent powered by LNG while at sea, and they will use LNG to generate electricity while stationed at the port. This marks the first time a cruise ship will use LNG to power ships both in the port and at sea.

    Speaking about the announcement, Carnival CEO Arnold Donald remarked: "Every step of the way, our focus is on designing state-of-the-art ships that provide a vacation experience our guests will love, and we are putting all of our creative energy and resources into making sure we achieve that goal."

  • ANGA Statement on EPA’s Proposed Natural Gas Star Methane Challenge Program

    From: ANGA Press Releases

  • From: ANGA Press Releases July 23, 2015

    ANGA Statement on EPA’s Proposed Natural Gas Star Methane Challenge Program

    Background: Following is a statement by ANGA President and CEO Marty Durbin on the Environmental Protection Agency's proposed Natural Gas Star Methane Challenge program.

    "We will be reviewing the details of the proposed Natural Gas Star program in the days ahead to see how the program would work in tandem with existing and upcoming regulations. We have always said that the best way to achieve reductions in methane is through collaborative measures. The fact that we have cut methane emissions from production activities by 38 percent since 2005 while increasing production by 35 percent bears that out. By contrast, it is clear that direct regulation will lead to regulatory uncertainty and fewer reductions over a longer period of time."

  • ANGA Statement on the Senate ENR Committee's Energy Policy Modernization Act of 2015

    From: ANGA Press Releases

  • From: ANGA Press Releases July 22, 2015

    ANGA Statement on the Senate ENR Committee's Energy Policy Modernization Act of 2015

    Background: Following is a statement by America's Natural Gas Alliance (ANGA) Executive Vice President for Government Affairs Frank J. Macchiarola on the Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee's Energy Policy Modernization Act of 2015.

    "ANGA applauds Chairman Murkowski and Ranking Member Cantwell on the introduction of the Energy Policy Modernization Act of 2015. The Committee's efforts are commendable as they seek to shape policies that better reflect our nation's changing energy landscape. In particular, we are pleased with the inclusion of legislation creating greater certainty and transparency in the LNG exports application process. This legislation will better enable the United States to leverage our abundant natural gas resources, secure greater energy diplomacy, and strengthen energy security while creating domestic economic opportunities.

    "We know the Committee recognizes the need for critical energy infrastructure and, specifically, we will continue to explore bipartisan solutions to address permitting challenges for natural gas pipelines. A modernized natural gas pipeline system is essential to ensuring reliable delivery of natural gas from supply basins to demand centers and such infrastructure will help strengthen economic and employment growth throughout the United States.

    "A strong energy exports policy and enhanced infrastructure are essential to ensuring we fully realize the potential of the shale revolution. We appreciate the leadership of Chairman Murkowski and Ranking Member Cantwell on these issues and look forward to continuing our work with the Committee as this legislation moves forward."

  • ANGA Statement on the House Energy and Power Subcommittee’s Energy Bill

    From: ANGA Press Releases

  • From: ANGA Press Releases July 21, 2015

    ANGA Statement on the House Energy and Power Subcommittee’s Energy Bill

    Background: Following is a statement by America's Natural Gas Alliance (ANGA) Executive Vice President for Government Affairs Frank J. Macchiarola on the House Energy and Power Subcommittee's energy bill.

    "We are encouraged by the House Energy and Power Subcommittee's recognition of the need for critical energy infrastructure and reliability planning, as well as its continued commitment to promote workforce development for the energy and manufacturing sectors. Chairmen Upton and Whitfield and Ranking Members Pallone and Rush should be commended for the thorough and deliberative process they have undertaken to develop this legislation. We are, however, disappointed that the subcommittee draft excluded legislation providing greater certainty and transparency for LNG export applicants.

    "Earlier this year, the House passed LNG export legislation with significant bipartisan support. Omitting these provisions misses an opportunity to leverage such bipartisan support to promote the use of our abundant natural resources for greater energy diplomacy and strengthened energy security. A robust export policy is essential to building the meaningful 'Architecture of Abundance' this committee is working so hard to foster. We will continue working with the committee as the process moves forward and are hopeful that policies advancing LNG exports will be restored."

  • When it Comes to Electricity, Two Cycles are Better than One

    From: ANGA Blog

  • From: ANGA Blog July 9, 2015

    When it Comes to Electricity, Two Cycles are Better than One

    Quickly becoming the workhorses of our nation's power generation fleet, combined cycle power plants are revolutionizing how electricity is produced in the United States. These plants are high-tech, efficient and they run on natural gas.

    General Electric's 9HA combined cycle gas turbine, also known as "HArriet"

    The way we generate electricity has remained unchanged since 1882, when New York's Pearl Street Station, the first centralized power plant in the United States, began operation. The process used by that facility – and most plants currently in operation today - starts with boiling water, capturing the steam and channeling it through a generator to produce electricity. You can think of a generator as an electric motor in reverse: where a motor receives an electrical current that causes it to spin, a generator receives an external force – steam, in this case – that causes it to spin and produce an electrical current.

    There are two things to note about this process. The first is that electricity is generated in only one process or "cycle." The second is that it takes a lot of energy to boil water. While considerable advancements have been made since the days of the Pearl Street Station, efficiency levels for the coal and nuclear plants that use this same process range from 32-48 percent and 33-37 percent.

    Combined cycle power plants address both of these issues. Instead of using natural gas to boil water, it is combusted in a jet engine-like turbine that directly turns a generator. Not only is this a more efficient use of natural gas,but heatfrom the combustion process is also captured and used toboil water, create steam and drive a second generator. This means that a combined cycle plant is generating electricity from natural gas in two cycles, and achieving efficiency levels of more than 60 percent.

    As utilities seek cleaner ways to generate the electricity we need, they are increasingly turning to this technology. In 2014, Florida Power and Light began operating a new combined cycle plant at its Riviera Beach location. The new plant, which replaces an older oil and gas-fired unit, produces enough electricity to power 250,000 homes. It also uses 33 percent less fuel. This saves Florida Power and Light's customers money and it significantly reduces emissions.

    Florida Power and Light isn't alone. According to industry analyst Black & Veatch, combined cycle power plants accounted for 21 percent of electricity in 2014. With reduced emissions and increased fuel savings, it's no surprise that these plants will account for 38 percent of total U.S. generation by 2038.

    Two cycles certainly are better than one.

  • A Fuel Secure Enough for Fort Knox

    From: ANGA Blog

  • From: ANGA Blog June 25, 2015

    A Fuel Secure Enough for Fort Knox

    Earlier this year, Fort Knox went off the grid. The electrical grid, that is.

    The Army base, which spans more than 100,000 acres across three Kentucky counties, is the first U.S. military base that can operate completely on its own without any outside power sources.

    By embracing the nation's ample natural gas resources, along with renewables such as solar panels and geothermal technology, Fort Knox has created an entirely self-contained energy infrastructure that can produce more than enough power to keep the base operational under any circumstance.

    The switch to natural gas and renewables came after a 2009 ice storm damaged utility lines and left Fort Knox without electricity for an entire week, severely downgrading the base's operations.

    Army officials began exploring opportunities to strengthen Fort Knox's energy security, and quickly discovered the key to reliable power resting just beneath the base: trillions of cubic feet of natural gas.

    According to Katherine Hammack, Assistant Secretary of the Army for Installations, Energy and Environment, "The solution at Fort Knox is a natural gas driven solution. Natural gas is dropping in cost. Natural gas is readily available and it's even available under our base."

    Today Fort Knox has six power generating sites that convert national gas into electricity, helping to save the base roughly $8 million in energy costs annually – funds the Army can now rededicate to better support our men and women in uniform.

    Better yet, geological studies indicate there's enough natural gas available on site to power the base for at least 30 years. When combined with the base's conservation initiatives and its investments in geothermal heating and cooling, solar energy and other renewables, experts predict natural gas will ensure Fort Knox can celebrate its energy independence for decades to come.

  • ANGA Statement on Passage of the Trade Promotion Authority Legislation

    From: ANGA Press Releases

  • From: ANGA Press Releases June 24, 2015

    ANGA Statement on Passage of the Trade Promotion Authority Legislation

    Background: Following is a statement by America's Natural Gas Alliance (ANGA) Executive Vice President for Government Affairs Frank J. Macchiarola on passage of the Trade Promotion Authority legislation.

    "ANGA applauds Congress on the bipartisan passage of Trade Promotion Authority. This much needed measure is a win for the American economy. This legislation will enable the United States to more effectively negotiate trade agreements with our allies and will create American jobs and lower our trade deficit. The United States is a leader in energy production, and this legislation will help us to export a portion of our nation's abundant and clean natural gas to new markets abroad and make America more energy secure."

  • ANGA Statement on the Louisiana Public Service Commission’s Decision on Long-term Gas Supply Contracts

    From: ANGA Press Releases

  • From: ANGA Press Releases June 24, 2015

    ANGA Statement on the Louisiana Public Service Commission’s Decision on Long-term Gas Supply Contracts

    Background: The following is a statement issued by Frank J. Macchiarola, executive vice president of government affairs of America's Natural Gas Alliance (ANGA), on the Louisiana Public Service Commission's (LPSC) decision to set up a pilot program establishing guidelines that encourage and enable flexible long-term natural gas contracts.

    "We commend the Louisiana Public Service Commission on its decision to set up a pilot program establishing guidelines that encourage and enable flexible long-term natural gas arrangements for power companies. By allowing electricity generators to enter into long-term contracts, utilities, natural gas producers and particularly customers can enjoy greater price stability and predictability, as well as enhanced supply security.

    "We urge other public service commissions to follow Louisiana's lead to examine the benefits long-term gas contracts can deliver to states all across the country. Abundant and affordable natural gas is ready to play a critical role in power generation by creating greater fuel diversity, maintaining electric system reliability and powering a cleaner energy future."

  • FERC Order Allows Continued Natural Gas Power and Infrastructure Growth

    From: ANGA Press Releases

  • From: ANGA Press Releases June 10, 2015

    FERC Order Allows Continued Natural Gas Power and Infrastructure Growth

    Background: Following is a statement by Amy Farrell, vice president of market development for America's Natural Gas Alliance on the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission's (FERC) order last night on electricity capacity markets.

    "While we are still reviewing FERC's order on capacity performance, it appears the order supports electricity reliability and allows for natural gas to be a growing part of our nation's energy mix.

    "Specifically, provisions in the order that enable natural gas combined cycle units to secure fuel and invest in infrastructure can lead to reliable electricity supply and allow the PJM region to take advantage of our nation's natural gas abundance.

    "We look forward to continuing our work with FERC and all regional transmission organizations to ensure market policies are in place that make it possible for all American electricity consumers to benefit from this clean and affordable energy resource."

  • America’s Ports - Transforming Land and Sea

    From: ANGA Blog

  • From: ANGA Blog June 4, 2015

    America’s Ports - Transforming Land and Sea

    American port cities are undergoing a transformation with the increased use of liquefied natural gas (LNG), powering growth in domestic commerce and international trade. Many port cities, including Jacksonville and Portland, are planning to build LNG export terminals to transport abundant U.S. natural gas to Asia, Europe and the Caribbean. At the same time, many boats and on-road commercial vehicles are switching to LNG-powered engines because of the low cost of available U.S. natural gas and its clean-burning nature, leading to improved economic and environmental outcomes.

    The Southeast Transportation Trailblazer

    JAXPORT, the port of Jacksonville, FL, is the number one port for the export of vehicles in America. It's also the hub for a growing LNG marine industry in the United States, with major natural gas players hoping to produce LNG for shipping fuel and exports there. Sea Star Lines and its parent company TOTE will use LNG-powered container ships for its Jacksonville-to-Puerto Rico run. Pivotal LNG and WesPac Midstream LLC are building an LNG plant in Jacksonville to supply those ships, along with others that enter the market. In addition, public utility JEA, in cooperation with Sempra, is studying the feasibility of a public-private partnership to build an LNG plant. Finally, Eagle LNG Partners is looking to build an LNG terminal that would export LNG to the Caribbean as well as fuel ships traveling between East Coast ports. It could also provide fuel for railroads and trucks looking to switch to natural gas. Powering cargo ships and other vehicles involved in trade out of JAXPORT is expected to economically strengthen the region and its extensive trade network. Local officials and business leaders expect the expansion of LNG transport capabilities to further benefit the city by employing skilled blue-collar workers.

    The Northwest Economic Stimulus

    In 2014, Portland, Oregon generated a local economic impact of over $300 million through its marine terminals and infrastructure. This figure is likely to increase by more than $50 million in annual tax revenue to the county when the port welcomes its first LNG terminal to export natural gas to Asia. The construction is expected to create 3,000 jobs and, once fully operational, the terminal projects to employ 125.

    Stretching down through Washington, the pipeline that will service the project could also supply "new clean local industries," diversifying the local Portland economy. Taking advantage of abundant U.S. natural gas, the LNG terminal will increase economic activity through exports and spur local development with a clean energy resource.

    A National Impact

    LNG is transforming more of America than many people may realize. In addition to JAXPORT and Portland, LNG terminal projects are being planned and executed in port cities around the U.S., spreading the economic and environmental benefits of natural gas. The Sabine Pass LNG terminal on the coast of Louisiana and the Cove Point LNG export terminal on the Chesapeake Bay together will create 6,000 construction jobs and permanently employ over more than 150.

    LNG is transforming local economies across the country, strengthening businesses and providing clean fuel for the transportation industry.